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Richard Nixon Used to Live Next Door to This Newly Listed Washington, D.C., Tudor

January 17, 2023

A Tudor-style home in the affluent Washington, D.C., neighborhood of Wesley Heights, has come to the market for $3.5 million, and it counts Richard Nixon among its former neighbors. Built in 1931, the more than 7,300-square-foot house stands at the end of a cul-de-sac, across the street from the brick manor that Nixon owned from 1957 to 1961, during his term as vice president. The six-bedroom property, meanwhile, was owned by Gen. George S. Patton's nephew, Fredrick Ayer, according to listing agents Robert Hryniewicki, Adam Rackliffe, Christopher Leary and Micah Smith of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties, who brought the property to the market last week. "This is one of the reasons why we love living in Washington, D.C.," Mr. Hryniewicki told Mansion Global. "There's a very good chance that historical owners of properties were influential or important during their time living there." "Very rarely though does the historical owner or famous neighbor add monetary value to the ultimate sales price, which is always predicated by location, house size, lot size and interior property condition," he said. "It absolutely does provide great historical context and value though."

A Tudor-style home in the affluent Washington, D.C., neighborhood of Wesley Heights, has come to the market for $3.5 million, and it counts Richard Nixon among its former neighbors. Built in 1931, the more than 7,300-square-foot house stands at the end of a cul-de-sac, across the street from the brick manor that Nixon owned from 1957 to 1961, during his term as vice president. The six-bedroom property, meanwhile, was owned by Gen. George S. Patton's nephew, Fredrick Ayer, according to listing agents Robert Hryniewicki, Adam Rackliffe, Christopher Leary and Micah Smith of HRL Partners at Washington Fine Properties, who brought the property to the market last week. "This is one of the reasons why we love living in Washington, D.C.," Mr. Hryniewicki told Mansion Global. "There's a very good chance that historical owners of properties were influential or important during their time living there." "Very rarely though does the historical owner or famous neighbor add monetary value to the ultimate sales price, which is always predicated by location, house size, lot size and interior property condition," he said. "It absolutely does provide great historical context and value though."